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clinton's future and her running for president in 2016? that is our question this morning on the "washington journal." you can start dialing in now, or you can contact us via social media. you can make a comment on our facebook page. you can also send us an e-mail. from "the hill" newspaper yesterday -- a new poll by abc news and "the washington post." 57% say they support a presidential bid from every clinton in 2016. -- from hillary clinton in 2016. 68% approved of her work as secretary of state. 66% hold a favorable view of clinton after her department has faced criticism over the handling of benghazi and libya. clinton also has heavy support in new york were 54% of registered voters say they would support a presidential bid by her in 2016. that is an "the hill" newspaper. we have lots of facebook comments already on this question. we want to share a couple of those with thieu. jackie says "she has my vote." williams says i think she has been a great job for secretary of state but will not vote for her for president. andy says hillary 2016. military spouses against the
satellite corp. 2012] >> later tonight on c-span, we will also show you secretary of state hillary clinton's keynote address from the same event. >> so particularly, in light of today's announcement, let me reiterate that this administration, like previous administrations, has been very clear with israel, that these activities set back the cause of a negotiated peace. we all need to work together to find path forward in negotiations that can finally deliver on its two state solution. that must remain our goal. >> secretary of state clinton talks about the cease-fire between israel and palestine. israel opposes a plan to build new settlements and the political reality -- israel's plan to build new settlements, and the political reality in the middle east. that is tonight at 10:00 on c- span. >> we had 12 million men under arms. we had two thousand officers and generals. today we have 1000 flight officers and generals and 1.2 million under arms. the ratio is totally out of whack. we have an admirable for almost every ship in the navy. -- admiral for almost every ship in the navy, not a capta
for independents. i think we have time for your point. caller: in a column today it said that clinton's 2001 balance the budget spent $1.94 trillion. today the revenue is $2.67 trillion. spending is $3.76 trillion. we are spending $987 billion more than if we had just increased the 2001 budget for inflation and population growth. i understand about the mores. i am incensed, as i think most voters are -- wars. i am incensed, as i think most voters are. host: the chair of the senate banking, housing and urban affairs committee is in his seat. the ring with secretary donovan is about to begin. -- hearing with secretary donovan is about to begin. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> i call this hearing to order. thank you for joining us, mr. secretary. i asked you to testify today because i'm deeply concerned about the recent report that the f.h.a. could potentially need taxpayer support for the first time in its 78-year history. i would like you to help the committee gain insight into the fiscal challenges at the f.h
named chief of staff to president clinton. alan simpson followed his father's footsteps into politics -- a u.s. senator. a law degree from the university of wyoming -- he was elected to the legislature in 1964 and the u.s. senate in 1978 where he served three terms and was elected as majority leader. leaving the senate, he has been director of the institute of politics at harvard and has practiced law. he is the author of the book "right in the old gazoo -- a lifetime of scrapping with the press." the breakfast is being underwritten by areva, a growing player in renewable energy and nuclear energy. we thank them for their support. as always, we are on the record here. please no live blogging or other means of filing -- to give you some time to think. there is no embargo, but c-span has agreed not to air the video of the breakfast until noon today to give those of you who actually paid to attend the breakfast time to file. finally, if you'd like to ask a question please do the traditional thing and send me a subtle, nonthreatening signal. with that, thanks again from our supporters and
clinton on the situation in the middle east. on thursday, vice president biden and former congressional leaders gather to pay tribute to former new hampshire senator warren rudman. he is best remembered as a key player in the iran-contra negotiations. also help orchestrate the appointment of now retired supreme court justice david souter who led the ceremony on capitol hill. this is just under two hours. >> good afternoon, everyone. we are still waiting on a few speakers. but i will begin. i am janeen shaheen, the senior senator from new hampshire, and i am pleased to be here with my colleague, senator ayotte, to welcome to this reception celebrating the life and service of warren rudman. we are honored to join in hosting this reception. senator rudman has been hailed as a public servant who reached across party lines to get the job done for his country and his state. warren rudman's independence and courage, his focus on maintaining good government, and fierce loyalty to his home state, new hampshire, is something we in congress strive to attain. we will miss him, but we will try to li
. keynotehillary clinton's clea address. just a talks about the cease- fire between israel and palestine. that is at 10:10 p.m. eastern here on c-span. >> at the end of world war two, we had 12 million men under arms. we had 2005 officers and generals. now we have 1,001.2 million under arms. the ratio was totally out of whack. we almost now have an active role for every ship in the navy. what we have done is gone through and look at areas we could not necessarily save all the money but we could transfer responsibilities out of the pentagon and consolidate programs and save a significant part of money. part of money. >>
. [applause] >> secretary of state hillary clinton on this id to which in the middle east. after that, a congressional tribute to late senator warren redman then another chance to see first lady michelle obama showing the white house christmas decorations to military families. tomorrow on washington journal, paul weinstein, the former senior adviser to the simpson bowles commission, on the wall the commission's recommendations are playing in the ongoing negotiations concerning the fiscal cliff. from the government accountability office, they discussed the state of the facilities at guantanamo bay and the factors to be considered in moving detainee's stateside. and what did it did for near east policy, the latest from egypt after president mohammad morsi granted himself hoarse above the court. washington journal, live at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979, brought to you as a public-service by your television provider. >> now secretary of state hillary clinton talks about her recent travels to the middle east to help broker a ceasefire
was elected in 1992 and in the 1993 budget we addressed fiscal responsibility by passing the clinton budget. it was very controversial. in fact it only passed by one vote in the house, and the vice president had the vote in the senate to break the tie. but that budget us on a trajectory towards fiscal responsibility. it was interrupted by a controversy in 1995 when the republicans, using the votes on that budget, picked up a majority in the house and tried to dismantle that budget. president clinton allowed the government to get shut down rather than dismantle the budget. that budget stayed into effect until 2001. in 2001 chairman greenspan was answering questions like, are we paying off the national debt too quickly, should we pay off the national debt. the projections were by 2008 the entire national debt held by the public would be paid off. no money owed to china, japan, saudi arabia. we would have paid off all those debts. all the money would be back in the trust funds by 2013. that's where we were the beginning of 2001, but the republicans talked people into thinking you could pass ta
an economic growth. first during the clinton administration, the top marginal tax rate was raised on the wealthiest individuals and the economy grew at its fastest rate in a generation. it added more than 22 million jobs. during the following eight years, the top marginal rate dax tax rate was lower, but economy never regained its strength from the reviews decade. middle-class families are vulnerable when the recession began at the end of 2007. i hope this hearing is helpful not just in this hearing, but across this country to people who are watching and waiting for congress to act. i will say more at the end about some of our members who are leaving. it is -- it has been an honor for me to serve as chairman of this committee and also served with my friend, kevin brady, as vice chair. he has been great to work with. i hope there'll be bipartisan success in congress. i look forward to working with him as i change seats in the senate for the next congress. i am grateful to our witnesses, whom i will introduce. before i do that, opening statements. >> i think the chairman for the rec
's the dignity of work and rewarding it and the fairness that the tax code that this is taking us to the clinton tax rates. others can speak to what it was under reagan and the rest of that. but the clinton tax rates which enabled the private sector to create more than 28 million jobs, enabled a great economic success to thrive in our country. so i think it comes down to the question that was mentioned, we say to the speaker of the house, the senate has passed a bill to extend the middle income tax cuts, the democrats stand ready to support it, the president stand ready to sign it. why? why are you holding this up? >> thank you. [indiscernible] >> friday on washington journal congressional his torn norman ordinary reason steen explains the changes that senate leader harry reid is pursuing. and stephen sloan will talk about the fiscal cliff. washington journal is live starting at 7:00 eastern on c-span. >> president obama travels to pennsylvania friday to talk about his plan to avoid the so-called fiscal cliff. we'll be live from the manufacturing company at noon eastern an c-span2 3. >> worked h
to work, does it? but in the clinton era when the rates went up, the 39.6 from 35 , they paid a little bit more and, guess what, the income boomed. we had 3.8% unploimed. we balanced the budget -- we had 3.8% unemployment. we balanced the budget. they opposed the tax increases in 4-. they said a disaster would result. not a single republican voted for the increases in taxes that president clinton put forward, which ultimately led to a balanced budget and paying down debt for the first time in 50 years. not one of them because they said it would bring economic disaster and instead is brought prosperity. so they brought out that old broken record, they glued it back together. maybe they put it on the -- put it in a digital format or something. but they're playing it again. it's as valid now as it was then. so it's the same old plan, stick it to the middle class, stick it to the seniors and benefit the ultrawealthy in this country. that's not a new plan. that's the same old broken record. the speaker pro tempore: the chair recognizes the gentleman from texas, mr. poe, for five minutes. mr. po
and clinton and everyone else thereafter, when they did that, now i understand they are just not the party that any of us would want to be involved with. that's all i have to say. host: the video we just showed was shot by a c-span producer with his iphone. it was the former senator in a wheelchair making his way into the chamber yesterday for that vote. here's the new york times with that story. and a screen grab. seven he sat in support of the tree. -- he sat in support of the treaty. he's 89 and is a republican at who was the majority leader. his wife elizabeth dole and he left the port and republicans voted down the street. he was recently released from walter reed military center. now an independent caller from ohio, lee. caller: good morning. i am calling about something i have not heard about. people willing to take the $15 or $20 extra they're getting from the to% tax break, it is coming off their pension when they retire. social security is based on what you contribute. host: you are talking about the payroll tax cut, extending that possibly as part of the fiscal cliff negotiation
in peace negotiations with other countries or president clinton's global initiative, former presidents have a valuable role in using their experience and knowledge to help the u.s. in both a public and private capacity. the world has changed dramatically since the 9/11 terrorist attacks. the threats to american personnel and interests continue as terrorists raged a war against the united states. arbitrarily limiting the secret service protection to 10 years might have been good after the cold war ended and before the global war on terror begun. in which they're considered targets, we must make sure that the security of our former chief executives are not jeopardized. h.r. 6620 recognizes that those who serve as president are symbols of america and american freedoms and deserve to be protected. there are only a handful of americans who will be called upon to serve this country as president. these individuals represent america not only while serving in office but remain in the public consciousness long after they leave. h.r. 6620 simply recognizes this unique role and reinstates lifetime prot
president clinton was in office, he left this country in the black. the people have weighed in. they've indicated that we want to move forward, we want to put people to work but we want to do it in a fair method of doing it. and that is not cutting programs that impacts the working poor in this country. mr. garamendi: well, you're absolutely correct about that. the proposal to cut medicare benefits is a nonstarter. there are things that can be done in medicare to reduce the costs and much has already been done. i'd like to ask my colleague from the great state of michigan to join us, mr. curson is a new member, came in during a special election. welcome. delighted to have you join us. mr. curson: thank you. i agree wholeheartedly with what's been said so far and the testimony, what i really want to say -- into the mic. what i really want to say is medicare is run more efficiently than nearly any insurance company in the world. they devote less than 2% of its funding to administrative expenses, and you compare that to a private insurance company that costs up to 40% of premiums for in
. >> mark zandi said returning to clinton-era tax rates would hurt the economy but is necessary to get the deficit under control. his comments came at a forum and also bush administration lawrence lindsay and clinton white house chief of staff. >> thank you so much and thank you chairman bachus for turning us and turn it over to peter cook who will moderate our tax panel on tax reform. >> i got a feeling you have to head back to the hill. we hope to come up with some answers and ideas from this panel. we have -- we'll write them down. i'll hand them to your staffer. you hear the mission. we have to come up with some ideas that can pass congress and meet with everyone's approval, so no small task. there are some new faces at the table and again, we want to welcome all of you and go around the table and introduce at least our new faces. we have got the brookings institution who has done a lot on fiscal issues. we have the lindsay group, former economic adviser to president bush. welcome. we have the chairman for the center of american progress. former chief of staff of bill clinton. john
rules. with all due respect to my friend, president clinton, and newt gingrich, who have been running around in recent years, patting themselves on the back, i truly believe the surpluses of the 1990's were generated by the agreement that came out of what tom foley and george mitchell and bob dole and george herbert walker bush did with the budget enforcement act, which required those budgets to make sure they did not spend more than they took in. i think the surpluses of the 90 or the best legacy of the budget agreement. i will stop there. >> thank you. let's turn to my old boss, the former chairman of this particular committee. a little factoid, he will remain in history as the longest-serving chairman of this committee because of term limitations placed after his departure. senator. >> thank you. thank you for your interesting remarks. it is interesting to see how things are similar and how things are so different. i want to say to all of you, my voice is not as good as it used to be. they tell me i still have hopes of it coming back. my recollection is not as good as it used to be
"the hill" newspaper. dixie is a republican in clinton, mississippi. what do you think? caller: good morning and thank you for taking my call. i think it is a surprise to me, and i cannot help but wonder why all the talk about increasing taxes, making cuts, and we need cuts, why the welfare is never addressed. we have people who are living like millionaires from welfare. they get free food, they get free housing, they get free schooling, they get -- the children get lunches two times a day at school. and they get all kind of benefits, but nothing is ever said about cutting any of that. that medical bills are paid. people criticize medicare, but people on medicaid get much better care than the people who are on medicare. i paid over $3,000 for my hearing aid, that came out of my pocket. if i had been on medicaid, that would have been absolutely free. but nobody ever talks about cutting any of that. i think every social program should have a sunset date. and besides, when they talk about cutting, that's never a cut, it's just a decrease in the amount of increase. i really think there's
as to the clinton tax rates. others can speak to what it was under reagan, but the clinton tax rates that enabled the price sector to create 20 a and jobs and unable the success to thrive in our country, i think it comes down to the question, we say to the speaker of the house, the senate has passed a bill to increase middle-class tax cuts. democrats are ready to support it. why? why are you holding this up? thank you. >> for more information about the fiscal clef, visit our web site c-span.org. >> friday on washington and now,norman ornsteein.. tax credits on family and businesses that would be impacted if congress does not impact the fiscal cliff. >> the program began, one of the and as as to president franklin roosevelt, to document conditions under which people were living. this is when we did talk have television. have of places didn't electricity said they couldn't listen to the radio broadcasts to find out what was happening and a parts of the country. he was the head of this project. 1939 when kodak had a color film, he had his photographers tried out. kodak was trying to estimate was a n
that will make very clear to us to assad, which if he crosses what secretary clinton called the red line and uses these weapons, chemical and biological, there will be grave consequences. essentially the end of his regime. i hope through the deterrence we can stop him from doing so, but i also believe that we as leaders of the world, the united states, has to begin to assemble an international coalition to prevent assad from using the chemical and biological agents against his own people. we have sat too long on the sidelines we are now getting engaged the need for engagement and more than that urgent action is clear and now. and i think we are all saying to president obama who has now stated very clearly there will be drastic consequences for assad and his government if they use weapons of mass destruction. we are with you. there is strong support across congress if the president takes the strong action that's necessary to prevent a very, very historically horrific humanitarian disaster in syria. senator. >> thank you, senator. we do represent a broad range of views from within the senate, the r
. his service as chairman of president clinton foreign intelligence advisory board, i watched him investigate some incredibly delicate and politically sensitive matters. president clinton trusted warren without question to get to the bottom and give him advice free of any personal agenda or partisanship. later as cochairman of the commission of national security with senator hart, he examined the state of homeland defense. he concluded it was terrible. nine months before 9/11, he recommended -- the homeland of security. it was not that he had some magic nearing to look around the corner of time. he looked hard at the facts. he was not afraid to draw the necessary and sometimes lonely conclusions. warren always look at the facts. like any great lawyer, that was his starting point. he was inpatient with ideology. he wanted the evidence and then you would jot his conclusions and chart his course. we would all do well to embrace today -- embrace that today. as a lawyer, he was a champion. he became the go to person for companies who need someone of impeccable and credibility to get to
for democrats, you are on caller: when clinton was on office we did good going through the household finance stuff. when bush came in he didn't have no programs. i had a $150,000 business going good with 10 employees. and i got sick with cancer. i had to sell everything. i didn't have no way to save my home or nothing. i don't understand why they do this. you try to work hard with the banks, you get a lawyer and the lawyer wants to rip you off. i don't understand. >> i guess i'm not exactly sure what the question is. there are lots of problems when people are in foreclosure and there are all sorts of problems they have. it's always good to try to work it out with the lender. the problem is that when push comes to shove the house is collateral and the thing we're talking about now which is a tax issue is what happens after you lose the house and do you have to pay more taxes. host: we have a graphic from the "wall street journal." the big short is the hoin. headline. >> you can see from the chart here the volumes of short sales for the previous 12 months period for each month and they just gr
overturned. it is very similar to what erskine bowles, the former clinton chief of staff, who was the co-leader of the simpson- bowles commission, separate from that commission, mr. bowles testified before the super committee last year and testified at that time. republicans say that their current model is modeled after that offer. the simpson-bowles model has gone on lot of talk in the last two years. it is proposed on democrats in these discussions. on the revenue side, but $800 billion that they are offering, that is the same of what speaker john vader, offered the president in their negotiations -- speaker john boehner offered the president in their negotiations in 2011. the white house has consistently signaled a loss of of weeks that they will not accept any deal that keeps tax rates for the wealthy. >> russell burma is a staff writer for the hill. thank you. >> thank you. >> and you can go to our website c-span.org to read the letter that the president wrote to house rubble can survey. it was signed by house speaker john vader, majority leader eric cantor, and four others. a group
as clinton did, and raising two girls under an intense bubble and the way he divides up his time. he has never missed a parent-teacher conference. if the president of the united states has never missed a parent-teacher conference, we shouldn't either. >> you have drawn parallels between him and fidel castro. >> i never said that. castro never been elected to anything, never run for office or put his name in front of anyone. that's not what i have ever said. i have drawn parallels between where government dominates the economy and where the president and some in his party wants to take us. cuba isn't just about going -- getting beat up on the side of a church because you dared to speak out against the government. i'm not drawing that parallel. >> do you feel less free than you did four years ago? >> our future economic options are being significantly diminished by some of the choices that have been made by the president and his party. i'll give you a real world example and i talked about this last night, i'm blessed to have a chance at a federal savings account, federal savings account fo
for a short time. we need to leave in a better shape. thank you. [applause] >> going back to clinton era tax rates on the rich will do less economic damage than other revenue raising options. here is part of a tax reform panel that featured lawrence john podesta.hn p >> thank you. i will turn the stage back to either cook from bloomberg. he will moderate -- to peter cook from bloomberg. he will moderate the discussion. >> we hope to come up with some answers from this esteemed panel. >> [inaudible] >> you heard it here folks. we need to come up with some ideas. thank you, chairman baucus. there are some new faces at the table. again, welcome to all of you. we will go around the table quickly and introduce at least our new faces. we have bill gale from the brookings institution. he has done a lot on tax and fiscal issues. we have lindsay, a former economic advisor for president bush. welcome. john podesta and chief of staff to bill clinton. welcome. john has to leave us a little bit early. i will go to him first when we begin. we also have the co-director of bill. we have will marshal as well
, it will matter to folks in tennessee. 39.6%, the top rate. a return to that, what we saw during the clinton years. what will that do to the economy? >> it will hurt, but it is necessary. let me make a few points. first, i think tax reform is obviously better than raising tax rates. raising the top marginal tax rate is less desirable than try to scale back reductions in the tax code. i think there are some reasonable approaches to tax reform. working for the day, going to -- i wish were king for the day, going through the code to decide what is good and what is bad. given that is not going to be the case, i think a proposal like maya's or even the president's is reasonable, and there is a lot of agreement for tax reform. $800 billion fromth the republicans. i think it is $600 billion from the president. i think there is room here for compromise. the second that i will say is that this tax reform will not generate enough revenue. $4 trillion. by my calculation, we do not need $4 trillion, but it is a bigger number than just tax reform will be able to generate, so in that context, we will have to le
. going back to the clinton tax rates, remember, the average american family has taken a hit. median income four years ago was $54,000 a year. it is about $50,000 a year now. this portion of the population has been squeezed. adding taxes on 90% will not be helpful. how much do you want folks to bear? freezing those tax rates for the overwhelming majority of americans is a smart thing to do. host: you said fight later on. guest: the fight would start the next day. we could do what i'm talking about, and negotiations could continue. doing what i'm talking about does not violate what either side is fighting over. they both say this is something we want to do. why not make sure we do not have some last-minute failure at the end of december. guest: what gives you confidence that democrats would agree later on? guest: this is where i disagree with some of my colleagues. they seem to think the american people are leveraged, and this is the democrats leverage. our leverage is in the spending and entitlement issues. the president and his negotiators are smart and able people. they know the re
, and republicans did not want to do that, but he has the good hand in this struggle. restoring the clinton tax rates is something i would support. we supported them back in 1991 when bill clinton was running for president. no problem on that. it is a reasonable adjustment, but may not be sufficient to reach the targets we need, and it does not help us in bipartisan bargaining, reaching a deal. i hope as this negotiation -- we ought to be at the irish times -- that they will not make a fetish of marginal tax rates if they should go up some, but do they need to go back where they were? i do not know. lots of ways to increase taxes on rich people, and it may be that a hybrid of marginal tax increases and the kind of base- broadening, loophole closing, expenditure closing that simpson-bowles proposed should be part of the mix. raising marginal rates does not guarantee you will get your intended target. very rich people depend more on investment income than on their labor income. if you want to get them -- and this is where mitt romney was able to pay a 14% tax rate on earnings of $14 million -- so
syria as a priority in its foreign policiy. we see the clinton administration in the 1990's, put an end for that. looking to the obama administration, what can the next secretary of state do to help the syrian people and such a critical time. >> thank you everybody for being here. i hope to see you next friday for our conference on jordan. thank you. [applause] >> tonight we will look at the white house and congress and how they are addressing the fiscal cliff. first president obama speaks in pennsylvania followed by house speaker john banner responding from capitol hill. then eric cantor response to the white house deficit reduction package. later, nancy pelosi addresses the fiscal cliff and middle- class tax cuts. tomorrow on ", washington "" robert -- "washington journal," robert van order on the mortgage loan forgiveness. adult'eman on being an with autism. plus, your emails, phone calls, and tweets. >> c-span, created by cable companies and venture 1979, brought to you as a public service by >> president obama talked about the so-called fiscal cliff and his proposal to end the bus
clinton chief of staff, and alan simpson, former republican senator. and they came together and what the president called his deficit reduction commission to give the president and -- an idea what we could do to get our fiscal house in order. i want to show in you this chart, mr. speaker, it's the chronic deficits we have had in this country, goes back to 1970. all this red ink represents the inflation adjusted, 2012 dollars, comparing apples to apples across this chart, the deficit that is we have had in this country, and you see going back to 197 o 0, mr. speaker, which happens to be the year of my birth, we have run a deficit every single year from 199 . you remember 1998 we had newt gingrich leading the first republican u.s. house of representatives in modern times. bill clinton in the white house. they came together to solve some big problems. welfare reform, health insurance reform. folks forget about health insurance reform. we did away with pre-existing conditions. did away with all of the impediments in the large group markets, what they call the plans, had great success in
in the past -- the famous showdown with newt gingrich and clinton. when you have divided government, you have clashes of major philosophical difference. the key is being able to have an element of compromise as part of that process. that is exactly the place we are in right now, trying to find that point. >> the best model for all of you who are working so hard on this may well be speilberg's movie about lincoln. lincoln made deals. you know what, he achieved great, great goals. it goes to the point you are making -- politicians are supposed to play politics, that is not a dirty word. >> the legendary "bloomberg view" columnist -- margaret carlson. >> i had this plan for a couple weeks -- i thought, this could happen. when you said you cannot get people in the corner as the president has with the tax increase on the wealthy -- here is the plan. on december 31, the bush tax cuts expire. after you have your champagne and you are funny hats on, on january 1 at 12:01 a.m., there is a middle-class tax cut and the top rate is 39.6%, then they are cut to 37%, so republicans get their tax cut. isn't
service for warren rudman. join as endicott p.m. eastern here on c-span. later, hillary clinton's keynote address on u.s./israel relations. this is at 10:10 p.m. eastern also here on c-span. in his weekly address, president obama talks about u.s. tax policy, the tax cut put in place at the it illustration that will expire at the end of this year. -- by the past administration that will expire at the end of this year. be on some important decisions that will have a real impact on our businesses -- and on families like yours. the most pressing decision has to do with your taxes. see, at the end of the year, middle-class tax cuts are set to expire. and there are two things that can happen. first, if congress does nothing, every family will see their income taxes automatically go up at the beginning of next year. a typical middle class family of four will see their income taxes rise by $2,200. we can't let that happen. our families can't afford it, and neither can our economy. the second option is better. right now, congress can pass a law that would prevent a tax hike on the first $250,000 o
of the 1990's and earlier in the 1990's with president bush, before president clinton, and then thereafter with president bush who came after president clinton, sometimes economic policies say it's time for a rest. and those tax cuts, the top 1% and 2%, it is time for rest. and to be able to shore up, to say to every american that you will get a tax cut for $250,000 of your income which includes 97% of small businesses is a reasoned response to the changing economy and the protection of the safety net is a reasoned response to the changing economy and the recognition of the importance of social security, the recognition of the importance of medicare, medicaid and the recognition of the importance, if you're unemployed, extending the unemployment responds to the people who don't get their news on a regular streaming basis, they don't know what's going on up here. they're counting on us to stand in the gap and to make a difference in their life. some of them are working. some are on assistance, but they're not defined by anything that they are americans who love their country. and i hope as
the rates on high earners to go back up to what they were under president clinton, and reducing the value of tax deductions and other tax benefits that they get. before i get to how much can be raised by the second, let me just say the president is very, very supportive of curbing tax deductions for high-income households. it's been a part of his plan from his very first budget. in fact, he was and remains the only major leaguer in washington that has put forward a specific, explicit plan that would limit those tax benefits for high- income households that's been examined by the joint committee on taxation, which is the official referee for these issues in congress. that plan, though, doesn't raise the revenue that you need. so out of the president's $1.6 trillion, $950 billion comes from decoupling. decoupling is the high-income rates going away, the middle- class tax cuts becoming permanent. that gets you $950 billion of revenue. the question is could you plausibly replace that revenue just by limiting tax expenditures. there have been lots of different ideas out there. it's always a li
in their impact. i know you do, mr. speaker, leon panetta, former chief of staff to president bill clinton, former chairman of the democratic-led budget committee here in the u.s. house of representatives, current secretary of defense calls these defense cuts devastating. this u.s. house has passed a proposal to prevent that second round of cuts from taking place. it's the only proposal anywhere in this town to have passed. we did in august. we took care of our business and we have yet to have partnership from either the white house or the senate. on that proposal. we took the sequester replacement reconciliation act in may. we took care of the job prevention recession act in august, mr. speaker. we took care of the national security and job protection act in september, mr. speaker. the work of this house has been done. month after month after month. we passed two budgets in a row, mr. speaker, that take on the tough challenges of entitlement reform, that take on the tough challenges of increasing revenue, that take on the challenges that no congress in my lifetime has ever taken on, mr. speaker.
in prevention have led to a turning point, the possibility, as secretary clinton said, and aids-free generation. however, cutting funding to international and domestic programs could very well turn back the clock. we must take action now to avoid the looming threat to more than one million americans, including more than 4,000 in my own district in illinois, who are living with hiv-aids. they can't afford the $538 million cut in sequestration that would affect our hiv-aids program. 15,708 people cannot afford to lose access to crucial lifesaving drugs. so let's stop these cuts and move forward towards an end to this epidemic. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady's time has expired. for what purpose does the gentlelady from california seek recognition? >> to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. ms. lee: thank you, mr. speaker. december 1 is world aids day. although every day is world aids day for the millions battling this epidemic on the frontlines. it's an important time, though, to reflect upon our loved one's lost, to celeb
-- a return. it is similar to what the former clinton chief of staff -- separate from that commission, he testified before the super committee last year and put forward his own proposal to try to break the impasse at that time. republicans say their current offer is not in that proposal, so it is not the simpsons-bowles plan that has gotten a lot of talk over the last few years, but it is modeled on a proposal from a leading democrat during these discussions, so they are hoping it will give some credibility going forward. the $800 billion they are offering is not the same as what john boehner offered in 2007. -- is the same as what john boehner offered in 2007. they will not accept any deal that keeps tax rates the same as well. >> thank you. >> thank you. >> you can read his proposal online by going to c-span.org and clicking to the lake. oklahoma congressman tom cole discusses the fiscal cliff negotiations and agrees with suggestions they should join president obama to extend the tax rates for the highest income earners the law professor john buckley looks at the history of the tax, plu
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